ABERDOVEY IS OPEN FOR BUSINESS TO VISITORS & HOLIDAYMAKERS  –  FAQs

Main photo of the Dyfi estuary looking east to the river Dyfi - photograph by Josh Cooper
Our Environment
Photo of morning mist on Tal-y-llyn lake - photograph by Josh Cooper
Photo of Aberdyfi beach and dunes from the estuary
Photo of the falls in Llaethnant Valley - photograph by Josh Cooper
Photo of bluebells in Coed Garthmor - photograph by Josh Cooper

If variety is the spice of life, we are lucky to be in a place where the landscape changes every few hours, with the ebb and flow of the tides, added to the changes brought by the seasons.

Life on the edge, literally the border line between wet and dry, fresh water and salt water is full of variety and our landscapes, framed by the hills of Ceredigion and the mountains of Snowdonia, support a great range of wildlife as well. National and international recognition is given to this and the Dyfi estuary and the Celtic Sea, between Wales and Ireland, have a particularly high number of sites which receive protection for their astonishing cast of animals and plants.

We quite often hear people comment ‘Aberdovey doesn’t change’, but of course it does. Our website gives some of the history of the area, a human heritage of seafaring, fishing and farming, mining and later, with the coming of the railway, recreation and tourism. People are still drawn to the beautiful setting and the fantastic beaches and we acknowledge a past which has shaped the village that we see today.

That touches on our past and our present, but the future brings big challenges, particularly those which are linked with climate change, for a village so close to the sea. In response, the community is trying to respond by thinking globally and by acting locally. With the attitude of protecting wildlife and enhancing the environment, we are aiming to repair, replenish and replace where necessary. You will find references to community wildlife reserves, a sustainable planting project with wildlife friendly aspects, beach litter clearing equipment and events and a tree planting programme which should make a contribution to carbon capture and sequestration.

Details of these may be found on this website, together with other information about the village activities, as well as through the Tourist Information Office on the Wharf and through the Community Council Offices (The Literary Institute, Seaview Terrace).

Dr Libby Andrews,  Aberdovey resident

Photo of Tal-y-llyn lake and valley leading to the sea - photograph by Simon Jones
Photo of two swans at sunset on the Dyfi estuary - photograph by Josh Cooper

ABERDOVEY IS OPEN TO VISITORS & HOLIDAYMAKERS  –  FAQs

Main photo of the Dyfi estuary looking east to the river Dyfi - photograph by Josh Cooper
Our Environment
Photo of Tal-y-llyn lake and valley leading to the sea - photograph by Simon Jones

If variety is the spice of life, we are lucky to be in a place where the landscape changes every few hours, with the ebb and flow of the tides, added to the changes brought by the seasons.

Life on the edge, literally the border line between wet and dry, fresh water and salt water is full of variety and our landscapes, framed by the hills of Ceredigion and the mountains of Snowdonia, support a great range of wildlife as well. National and international recognition is given to this and the Dyfi estuary and the Celtic Sea, between Wales and Ireland, have a particularly high number of sites which receive protection for their astonishing cast of animals and plants.

We quite often hear people comment ‘Aberdovey doesn’t change’, but of course it does. Our website gives some of the history of the area, a human heritage of seafaring, fishing and farming, mining and later, with the coming of the railway, recreation and tourism. People are still drawn to the beautiful setting and the fantastic beaches and we acknowledge a past which has shaped the village that we see today.

6 photos of the Dyfi estuary and beyond - photograph by Josh Cooper

That touches on our past and our present, but the future brings big challenges, particularly those which are linked with climate change, for a village so close to the sea. In response, the community is trying to respond by thinking globally and by acting locally. With the attitude of protecting wildlife and enhancing the environment, we are aiming to repair, replenish and replace where necessary. You will find references to community wildlife reserves, a sustainable planting project with wildlife friendly aspects, beach litter clearing equipment and events and a tree planting programme which should make a contribution to carbon capture and sequestration.

Details of these may be found on this website, together with other information about the village activities, as well as through the Tourist Information Office on the Wharf and through the Community Council Offices (The Literary Institute, Seaview Terrace).

Dr Libby Andrews,  Aberdovey resident

ABERDOVEY IS NOW OPEN TO VISITORS  –  FAQs

Main photo of the Dyfi estuary looking east to the river Dyfi - photograph by Josh Cooper
Our Environment

If variety is the spice of life, we are lucky to be in a place where the landscape changes every few hours, with the ebb and flow of the tides, added to the changes brought by the seasons.

Life on the edge, literally the border line between wet and dry, fresh water and salt water is full of variety and our landscapes, framed by the hills of Ceredigion and the mountains of Snowdonia, support a great range of wildlife as well. National and international recognition is given to this and the Dyfi estuary and the Celtic Sea, between Wales and Ireland, have a particularly high number of sites which receive protection for their astonishing cast of animals and plants.

4 photos of the Dyfi estuary and beyond - photograph by Josh Cooper

We quite often hear people comment ‘Aberdovey doesn’t change’, but of course it does. Our website gives some of the history of the area, a human heritage of seafaring, fishing and farming, mining and later, with the coming of the railway, recreation and tourism. People are still drawn to the beautiful setting and the fantastic beaches and we acknowledge a past which has shaped the village that we see today.

That touches on our past and our present, but the future brings big challenges, particularly those which are linked with climate change, for a village so close to the sea. In response, the community is trying to respond by thinking globally and by acting locally. With the attitude of protecting wildlife and enhancing the environment, we are aiming to repair, replenish and replace where necessary. You will find references to community wildlife reserves, a sustainable planting project with wildlife friendly aspects, beach litter clearing equipment and events and a tree planting programme which should make a contribution to carbon capture and sequestration.

Details of these may be found on this website, together with other information about the village activities, as well as through the Tourist Information Office on the Wharf and through the Community Council Offices (The Literary Institute, Seaview Terrace).

Dr Libby Andrews,  Aberdovey resident

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